Category: Uncategorized

London county council & world war I

I don’t have anything amazing to say in this post, but I do have a site which I spent many hours building around Christmas 2017. Sadly, like many of the soldiers in the trenches in that time, I was struggling a little at work, and was getting up at 6am in the morning over the Christmas break for some reason, I have no idea why, but it did happen.

During these early morning sojourns on the internet, I built a site around the London County council and their employees who served during world war one. I stopped building the site shortly after, but it is pretty amazing what I can do in quite  a short period of time.

The London County Council provided a service record of the Great War, in 1920, and this was awarded to all of its former staff. It is a brilliant record of the war; and its highs and lows, the dead and those awarded with gallantry medals; this record actually lists about 10,000 former LCC personnel, and brief details of their war record, including deaths and their length of service, their regiment, and any gallantry awards etc.

I recorded this detail at the London18.co.uk site; plus a sister site. I cannot remember why I split the details, but both are worth a visit. In addition are added records of some gallantry awards, and other regimental information.

I left employment later that year through early retirement. I doubt I would have lasted a week in the trenches, what an awful war. And then, in 1918, followed a massive flu epidemic killing off  another 3-5% of the world population – known as the Spanish flu epidemic. In modern days, I think we call this bird flu, and will happen again sometime soon.

Whatever. And now we have Trump, ignorant moron, refusing to accept climate change, and who will kill the planet and most of us in the next 10 years or so.

Happy days.

 

My lovely London street directory, Mile end road & the Isle of Dogs in maps

I am sort of overstepping my mark by making this a blog about the Isle of Dogs. The main reason is to flag up a site which I am nothing like, but I do things differently. If you want to see how to use maps in a brilliant manner, visit the Isle of Dogs blog ; it is pretty special; and I want a reminder of this blog. Mick is one of my contributors to the pub site.

Back onto my lovely London directory. I have been using it masses today. As I am working on some of the earlier records. e.g. in 1805 and 1820s, a street directory for 1832 comes in real handy.

Also, I was having a quick scan of the Whitechapel 1841 census earlier. My god, how easy was that to work out what pub a person was in, when I also had the 1842 street directory to compare with. Do you know what, I think I have finally cracked it, and all without maps so far – that’s the next bit to do.

As my usual aside, my wife came running downstairs with her laptop to show me St Marks square in Venice today. It is flooded massively, I think 150 centimetres of rain was mentioned! That’s five feet! It was a whole lot drier last week.

What else, oh yes, the Kings Head in Mile end road at 230; now just a kebab shop. After following some of the links from the London 1832 street directory, and also noting quite  a bit of early research added to the pub, I am now almost 100% certain this was previously the Weavers Arms, and goes back to  about 1823 with additional earlier pubs added for the same licensee.

I am now off to watch Paddington station on Channel 5, brilliant.

 

Paddington Bare

I have been watching in  absolute admiration the Channel 5 program about Paddington station and the behind the scenes work which keeps this area and the extremely busy London railway station running with 100,000 passengers every day. This adds to todays news, well yesterdays, that a new test train had caused major problems with the overhead power lines, ouch!

I have been looking at whether I cover this area properly with historical detail, particularly pub history. Here is a great example over 100 years which shows the onset of time on a small part of London. The New Red Lion, Harrow road, Paddington.

My 1832 street directory is almost complete – I say this every day! It really is. I will confirm when I have added the last pages for streets starting with G.

 

 

The London 1832 street directory & pub history

It has been four days since I put pen to paper, well it is actually fingers to keyboard these days. In the meantime, I have been rather busy building the London 1832 and London 1842 street directory. It is nearly complete! Just a few more weeks work, or maybe just a few days.

The sites are getting well spotted in google search, and increasing the numbers of visitors to the sites. At the same time, they (google) have decreased the pennies per click considerably, bastards. That just reminded me of “penny for the guy”, or “bob a job” in Scouts.

I have just  realigned the navigation for this site to make it more interesting for mobile users, i.e. most people these days. I will roll this out onto all of my other sites shortly. It uses lots of dropdowns which seem to work, although I am yet to test it out properly.

Back to the London street directory pages, they are looking really good, I think. If you don’t like them, show me a resource which is as good!

Actually, I will go slightly further and say they are blooming marvellous.

 

 

 

A London Robsons 1832 and 1842 street directory is building fast

A new site listing the entirety of the  London 1832 street directory with an alphabetical index of all the streets linked to a page for each street is building very fast, and close to completion – well stage one is nearly complete.

Each individual page lists a complete transcription of the traders living along that street as listed in the Robsons directory. Where appropriate, if a trader is a licensee or tavern keeper, there will also be a link from that person, and their address to an entry on the historical pub history site which is brilliant for London and many other areas.

In addition to the listing in 1832, in  which there is not a great amount of detail about the trades of those named, there are in many cases, an image on the same page which corresponds to the 1842 Robsons London street directory. This is very useful, as the information is much more detailed. The 1842 images are just that, they are not a transcription, and therefore a visual check of each images is required. The search engines have so far made the  inference that these images relate to the 1832 trade directory, which they do in road name only!

As an added bonus on one or two pages, the 1842 London street directory has also been transcribed. There is not a plan on doing this for every page, although if anyone wishes to help with this, it may happen eventually,

The 1842 London street directory transcriptions have been added with a simple bootstrap code which allows the text to be viewable or hidden, which is the default.

A good example, the second page to have this addition is on the Star street, Shadwell page. This page was chosen as this early historical detail is currently missing from the pub history site, with details back to about 1851 only, at present. This will change very soon.

Enjoy this new concept, and any suggestions on making the pages even more useful would be very welcome; there is a plan underfoot to link each page to a mapping, but this has yet to be decided. The pages which do link to the pub history site already offer a lot more detail about the specific road / street through a period of time, sometimes up until modern days, and other times for just a few years or decades.

And an addition to the site just recently has been the 1818 Johnstones  London commercial guide, this is in its infancy and lacks detail about pub history, and will therefore be completed as I see fit.

The siege of Sidney street, Mile end E1 and publicans

I have been researching Sidney street in Mile end today. I received a couple of rather excellent photographs of the 1911 siege of Sidney street when some Latvian anarchists were held siege for seven hours. It is a brilliant way of researching an area, having a story to tell.

What I also like to add to the story is something about the families of the time, in my case the licensees of the Sidney Arms, a beer house at 131 Sidney street; and also the Rising Sun at 131 Sidney street. Both of these buildings were probably demolished in world war two from incendary devices, bombs, doodlebugs etc. In fact they had both stopped trading by this time, and no pubs existed in Sidney street, but this is incidental. I looked at the area on google maps a moment ago, and nearly the entire street has now been rebuilt with modern architecture.

More of interest to me was the licensee Phillip Goldapple who was listed in the 1911 census at the Rising Sun. He was only there for another five years before moving on to the Fountain in Jamaica street; and  it was not until you start researching a particular surname do you find the story of the family for at least the next fifty years in the East end licensing trade. I am almost certainly missing many of the other family members who also had pubs, but the Knave of Clubs , in Bethnal green road, was in the family from at least 1934 to 1964, probably longer.

That’s it really. And there’s lots more detail on the site/s. Another interest I discovered was whilst researching some of the incendiary devices (bombs) dropped on London and this will be another story to tell. There is lots of useful detail online and available to view at London museums and the London Metropolitan archive.

Johnstones London commercial guide in 1818

I thought I would share more detail on a new venture. The Johnstones London commercial guide in 1818 is fairly basic, and lists a few well known taverns and inns, and lots of wine & brandy merchants and lots of other trades.

What is brilliant, is now I can compare a street in 1818 with a street in 1832 and 1842 at the same time, and spot the matches. Its not always easy to match a wine and brandy merchant with a particular address, this makes it so easy.

Aldersgate street was a very good example. I only found a few matches, but hey ho.

There are a lot of the inns and taverns which are not listed in 1818, so it is far from perfect, but it’s another very useful tool; and its a great directory to have on the site and all alphabetical.

Obviously it is going to take me a while to add it, but then I have the time!

Enjoy.