London street directory in 1832, 1842 etc & London pub history

The London street directory which I am building slowly from early London directories is now reaching an important stage. All of the Robsons 1832 street directory is now listed in transcript form on the site; there is an individual page for each street or road. The vast majority of the 1842 street directory has also been added to the relevant pages in image format. This latter detail gives a significant amount of additional detail to that of 1832, which is fairly basic.

Both of the Robsons directories are being cross-checked with the Pigots 1833 directory listing of pubs, which has been brilliant in  confirming whether a street did actually exist in 1832 even if not listed. There is nearly twenty years of pub history research on my sites, and it is fairly detailed, and also fairly thorough.

I have also been starting to add the early coffee houses, taverns and hotels to the relevant directory; the early street directories make this so much easier to locate a specific area and parish to add these entries. These street directory listings are in an entirely different format to anything which currently exists, and should be viewed as an incredibly useful and freely available resource.

The addition of mapping an early street address to an early map is starting to take place. The mappings I am using also show the address in modern day format using the National Library of Scotland site in the links.

Basically, the London history site is improving every day, and the current build is all being completed and funded by one person (me), with zero additional funding from any organisations.

I hope you enjoy the site, and other historical sites like the pub history site which is particularly strong in London for extensive earlier research.

Let me know if you wish to help out in anyway, or even an offer to sponsor the sites would be great.

Kevan

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My lovely London street directory, Mile end road & the Isle of Dogs in maps

I am sort of overstepping my mark by making this a blog about the Isle of Dogs. The main reason is to flag up a site which I am nothing like, but I do things differently. If you want to see how to use maps in a brilliant manner, visit the Isle of Dogs blog ; it is pretty special; and I want a reminder of this blog. Mick is one of my contributors to the pub site.

Back onto my lovely London directory. I have been using it masses today. As I am working on some of the earlier records. e.g. in 1805 and 1820s, a street directory for 1832 comes in real handy.

Also, I was having a quick scan of the Whitechapel 1841 census earlier. My god, how easy was that to work out what pub a person was in, when I also had the 1842 street directory to compare with. Do you know what, I think I have finally cracked it, and all without maps so far – that’s the next bit to do.

As my usual aside, my wife came running downstairs with her laptop to show me St Marks square in Venice today. It is flooded massively, I think 150 centimetres of rain was mentioned! That’s five feet! It was a whole lot drier last week.

What else, oh yes, the Kings Head in Mile end road at 230; now just a kebab shop. After following some of the links from the London 1832 street directory, and also noting quite  a bit of early research added to the pub, I am now almost 100% certain this was previously the Weavers Arms, and goes back to  about 1823 with additional earlier pubs added for the same licensee.

I am now off to watch Paddington station on Channel 5, brilliant.

 

Spitalfields, Gravesend, Venice & London 1842 directory

Lots to report in this new post. I took a short trip to Venice, the Italian version, and had a wonderful break for a few days. During this time, I started to read a rather brilliant historical book by Dan Cruickshanks on Spitalfields. I had a book token to use, and this book took my fancy! It is rather excellent so far, and more.

I did not know that Spital comes from the word hospital, apparently it does. The book on Spitalfields is quite heavy reading, and more a textbook rather than a light read. That’s OK, it is pretty brilliant so far, after about the first few chapters. Interestingly, amongst the credits are a favourite of mine, Sarah Wise; and also the Spitalfields Life website and many more.

A quick aside, my wife and I had a long, drawn out discussion about the words utmost & upmost; we both use different words, as we were both unaware of the other word. Look these words up if you want to know the general outcome!

Once home from a break, I answered an interesting email on Gravesend. It took me two days of my research time to update Gravesend pub history in about 1851. For the record, Gravesend is not in London, it is fairly near, but in Kent on the southern borders of the River Thames. It made a splash in the news recently because of a Beluga whale from the Arctic spending some time here.

Finally, I am back to updating the London street directory for 1842 / 1832 etc. By tomorrow, all of the letter B should be complete with 1842 street directory images, e.g. Brook street, Ratcliff.

Enjoy

 

Thames Footpath walk in London 1

Well, as promised, a walk along the River Thames in London.

I used the Thames Path site to print off some of the suggested walks from Tower Hill, i.e. by the Tower of London, and heading east. I decided I would take a walk on Thursday, being retired! Then Friday, but my wonderful wife who is still working,  wanted to come too, so Saturday it was.

A quick c2c trip towards Fenchurch street, and after deciciding NOT to get off at Limehouse to save £5 in the rail fare (a good choice as it was suggested it was at least 39 minutes walk to Tower Hill).

At Fenchurch street, if you know the area,it is a very short walk of two minutes to Tower Hill Underground station on the District line. Then you need to read the guide, or look at the maps, or generally head for the river; we did all of these, and ended up in St Katharines dock, which is a modern  bunch of buildings, a marina for very expensive river craft, and apart from the fact it was probably an expensive place to live, I thought it was probably designed and built by an failure in architects – whatever.

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It appears the Queen has been on a night out in London, and got a cab home, leaving the yacht moored in the local council estate

After a short while, we (me) decided to change plans and head for the City, along the embankment. Along past the Tower of London towards Tower Bridge. The Tower bridge is an amazing place to visit as a tourist, as we had discovered in a previous visit. And strangely, there was a Channel 5 program about the bridge that evening. I have recorded this, as it looks rather good.

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You can see from the picture of Tower Bridge that the Shard is in the background. The old and the new.

After Tower bridge is London bridge – apparently. I will elaborate more on this comment as we discovered what the various bridges were called, and in some cases we are still not sure.

What does become apparent very quickly is how little we know about London and the River Thames. You can live close by all your life, but it is not until you actually research an area, do you have a better understanding of the overall view.

Looking at the London Bridge as we walked along the embankment :

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What was interesting was how much shoreline we could have visited, albeit being low tide. And as you get closer:

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And next on to the wobbly bridge. This was the bridge which wobbled so badly they had to close it for a while, and aptly named the Millenium Bridge as that is its proper name, but will alwaysDSCN0337[1] be known as the wobbly bridge!

What is now becoming apparent is the number of ferries which are being incorporated into the London rail network, or TFL. The costs are highlighted transparently at the various boat stations along the Thames; along with timetables etc. It would appear there are a lot more services in the week, and the weekends are  quieter. This seems a shame, seeing the number of tourists who were queueing for this service; maybe they do not want to reduce the boat trips offered by the many private companies who are offering something similar?

Here is one of the many stops, with Backfriars bridge in the background.

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London history, London bridges, River Thames etc.

I received a book token earlier in the year for one of my birthdays. I am now retired, although long before my time!

A visit to Chelmsford on a very wet day for other reasons found me in all of the book stores in the City. I found a book by Peter Ackroyd which was selling in one of the major book sellers, at about £25, and just out of interest, I wondered how much cheaper this could be bought in Amazon land.

About a month later, a hard backed book, apparently second-hand, arrived from the USA. The cost was probably a quarter of the book I had seen in the shop previously. I don’t actually know the exact detail, as I don’t have an Amazon account.

As I often profess an interest in rivers and waterways, I quickly gobbled up the opening lines of this new book. The River Thames has 134 bridges, and a number of locks above Teddington. That’s good enough for me. I need to visit all of these bridges, when can I start?

As an aside, my visit to Whitechapel in June cost me £3 in rail fares for a day out.

So, with this detail in hand, how do I visit the Thames, do I drive or take the train?

I did a quick search on walks along the River Thames, and there are a number of footpaths which have been organised and mapped for anyone who wishes to partake in a little leisurely stroll. I am off for the first tomorrow.

Here’s the link for the Thames path – and lots of walks, of which I need many.

I will let you know how I got on.

Kevan

London 1832 street directory of London

I seem to be getting there slowly, if this makes sense. I cannot believe how long it is taking me to add a solitary street directory of London.

It will be useful once I have added this, and images of the 1842 street directory which give a considerable amount of detail as regards trade details for a street.

I am also adding links from this 1832 directory to the relevant pubs at the time. You can then see where these pubs addresses changed through time as street renaming took place in all of London to remove common street names.

Anyway, I am working through letters C & G at present, and all will be complete soon, mehopes.

 

 

Early pub history of London

I have to write this about my research, and others who have helped me in this. The Early pub history of London is continuing to grow in stature.

Basically, what I am saying, is that it is amazing the amount of detail which is now listed on my sites/s on pub history for London and many other areas.

Just find a page, NOT one of the holder pages for the other additional counties, and enjoy the amount of detail listed. It is all very personal to the relevant publican / licensee of an individual address, and I cannot change this; or make it more interesting to others who are not linked to this family.

What the site is slowly starting to list is the proof that these establishments actually existed, and naming bodies in the buildings through that time, and they are usually live bodies. The other main area I am addressing is the old streets that originally existed and were devolved into new areas as they were redeveloped.

I am very keen to endorse the London pub history site as a major development in mapping old street names which no longer exist. I have not worked out how I am going to do this, but it will happen.

Enough for this post.