Category: pub history

I’m never going to be rich, but my sites are fantastic

OK, the story is in the heading. I have been building web sites, good & bad, for about 18 years. The idea was that this would be my pension top-up, apparently not the case. This is not surprising as there are some billions of people out there who also have the same idea. There is also China who steal and copy what they cannot create; probably like the rest of the UK, and the world.

Anyway, along the way, I have built a few sites which are not bad. I always trend in the top ten for pub history, and more recently for London street directory, these are my main identifiers.

I have been let down by google adsense over the years, I believe, but have stuck with this process for a long time. It is simple, and just works. I like a system which is painless, and just does what it should do. It covers my costs for running my own web server, just about.

So, why do I do this? I spend vast amounts of hours updating pages, and building web sites, etc. I could stop any time, and just stare at my phone, like the vast majority of people who need that recognition.

Why do I do this? Because I want to be Number 1, or in the top ten, or just recognised for doing something nobody else can do. Its a recognition thing.

Or whatever.

Kevan

 

London street directory & create a sitemap

Being my normal self, I thought I would have a bit of a change today. So, the london19.com site became important again, it should, what a great name.

I have added the street directories for 1818,1832, 1842, 1843, 1940 and I think that’s all to this site. I have kept all pub stuff on the pub history site, and the 1921 street directory too. I am not sure why I made this decision, but anything can be changed.

The good thing is that the pub history site now has just under 50,000 html pages, which all fit on one sitemap for google. Good old google.

If you are ever interested, i can tell you how to create a site map of even this magnitude in a matter of a minute. Lets do it.

You first need to login via ssh to your linux web site hosting, I use putty which is a free ssh utility. You need to know the correct login details, too.

You then change directory to the top folder for your website, something like :

/var/www/vhosts/p**/httpdocs , e.g. cd /var/www/vhosts/p**/httpdocs

You then run a simple script which finds all files in the folder/s:

find `pwd` > foundthislot.txt

You then need to pick the specifics from this file, i.e. all of the .html pages

cat foundthislot.txt | grep shtml > findjusthtml.txt

Its quite simple.

Download this last file via ftp as you would normally, then do a grand edit of this file so that each line is relevant to the web page you are visiting.

 

Sitemaps are very important, and although this is easy; it took me a couple of years to get this right!

Don’t laugh at me for posting such a ridiculously simple way of creating google sitemaps. It really is that simple, it just took me a long time to realise the potential of linux power against the weakness of running in a Windows environment, which is good for desktop applications only.

You also need to use google webmaster tools to upload the sitemap at some stage, and see how your site is doing in desktop and mobile visibility, but this is another story.

 

 

 

 

Maybe I’m a Londoner

My last blog sounded a bit desperate. sorry, I spend a lot of time getting my sites updated with lots of interesting data content, even if it s all a bit nerdy. Perhaps I have rather a lot of different web sites running under the same name, and I could split them all up into separate entities.

But, no, I will concentrate on what I think I am trying to do, and explore the possibility that what I am trying to achieve is something different from other conventional sites.

Lets see what is on offer on my main site. It covers pub history of some sort for London and most of the South of the country. It is stronger in the London areas, but it does have the restriction that most data is before 1944. Excepting the complete listing of all pubs and bars in 2018.

Then there is more detailed data just on London, mainly to do with pubs from about 1800, and also complete London historical directories for 1832, 1843 and parts of 1921 and 1940.

Then there is a small site I built a while back as nogobritain, which demonstrated the difficulties which people with disabilities have with public transport, and this includes a complete listing of the entire tube network, and links to the relevant detail. some of this may be out of date, but still a damned good try.

More recently, well, the Christmas before last, I built a site or two about the 1918 armistice. As part of this, I honed in on a publication by the LCC which listed every Londoner who worked for the LCC (London County Council) who was involved in service in World War One. All of them, about 10,000, I think. I also added some other records of similar nature.

Then there is the Cosford database of Suffolk, this is part of Suffolk where my early agricultural labourer descendants started. They ended up in London, as did many others as agriculture was overrun by cheaper imports from America, and country folk moved into London to find work. I did quite a bit of research on my Suffolk ancestors by visiting record offices, but this database far outweighed any detail I could find at record offices or online. I saved a copy for merit, from the time machine, it’s brilliant.

I think I have summarised my main site, although I have others which research other areas of pub history and early taverns, coffee houses etc etc.

All my sites are searchable by one search engine, it is far from perfect, but I use it a lot.

One last point, I had a drive into London on the second day of the new year. It was an enjoyable drive, and I photographed a number of pubs which were useful. Obviously, driving in London is not conducive with taking photographs, and I got my first £65 fine through today for this! Whoops.

 

 

 

Pub history in 2018

I don’t even know where to start with this one. I guess I could talk about Brexit (without any emotion) to clarify my hunger for adding pub history around the UK to my various sites.

So, a short while back I discovered a rather excellent database on the web which lists the Foods Standards Agency data for pubs and licensed premises. This was for August 2018, and the label said, no restrictions on what you do with the data.

So, I kept a copy. I then dabbled again with database technology, i.e. mysql, and had a copy which i could run queries against. Then I dropped that idea!

Next, I worked through just the London Boroughs, which was highly useful. I know for example, that Havering is a London Borough, largely in Essex prior to about 1965 or 1974. I knew very little about which other London suburbs were also now in London. Anyway, to cut a story short, this supplied me with a list of about 4,400 pubs and their modern address and postcode.

I am a bit of a nurd, if this is the correct term, and I like data. I collect data for London pub history, not always very interesting, but it shows the occupants of an address which was a pub at some stage in its life over the last two hundred years; and lots of useful facts. Its what i do. I do the same for many other areas around London, and it is also fairly strong in Essex etc, but much of my data runs out around 1944. To find later listings takes quite a lot of effort, and then match these in with earlier addresses, etc etc. is even harder.

So, I do have the best collection of data for London pub history, however boring it may look – my view also! It does not stop me doing this.

And then I watched the Channel 4 program on Brexit, a dramatisation of how the referendum was won. Again, with no emotion, this clearly endorsed the view that there are many people outside of London who do not feel they are included, and almost ignored for their role in life. This is where it gets interesting.

There are the usual elections every four years, in which two or maybe three electoral parties fight over a specific area, and the outcome of each vote elects an MP for that area. The turn-out for these elections can be quite low. Many feel that their voice (one vote) makes little difference. Those that do vote are often voting for what they believe is the least draconian outcome, hence the reason the Conservative party continue to stay in power, or sometimes the Labour party.

Very few people around the country really understand that a vote can make a difference, some of us do.

But, in the case of the Brexit referendum, it was a choice to remain or leave the EU. The eventual vote was hailed as being very racially biased, it was largely based on hysterical views on both sides as to the eventual outcome. It split families and different age groups significantly, with the younger people more interested in remaining in the EU, and the older, typical voter more likely to have the opposing view.

It also involved a significant percentage of non-voters to decide to be ‘heard’ for the first time, as a call for help, or ‘take back control’ or however you wish to describe this. This is good, even if the outcome was distorted.

Back to pub history. There are 4400 pubs in London, but over 50,000 around the UK. A huge number of pubs have closed over the years for may reasons, often because of being tied to a particular brewery, and therefore not being  economical; or just because they were too quiet. Many others have been burnt down (eventually) for reasons of building application reforms, etc. Sometimes they use a digger truck to knock a building down the day before a preservation order! Life happens.

The bigger winners have been the newer pubs opening with a different economic model, that of being larger pubs,  selling local foods at affordable prices, a range of beers at affordable prices, etc. I am mainly referring to Wetherspoons, who are also a major advocate of exiting the EU, and are very clear on this subject in a number of ways. This economic model works brilliantly, and I have to say, I like their pubs. I was eating in their Lincoln pub at the weekend, food good, soft drink was OK.

Most Wetherspoon pubs have very little history as a pub, but most people who drink in them are happy with the historical stories they are told about the area. It’s a pub, not a museum.

Where am I going with this? Well, I now have a number of pages, all linked from one page of the entirety of the UK pub scene as listed in August 2018. I started it in London, and have been adding links to the various pubs which still exist.

I have now extended this to other vast parts of the country, and I am working on Lancashire at present. There is still more to come, but the relevant point is that London is very important, but so is the rest of the country, and it is at a factor of over ten to that of London. The most annoying fact is that I know so little about all of the UK, and I wish I knew more. But I do data, and that’s where it ends.

I like data, however insignificant. I don’t usually ramble on so much about anything, but needed to share this.

Fulham pub history

An interesting couple of days updating the early pub history of Fulham. It is not complete, I never complete an area, as I cover far too much, but it has had two full days of my time or maybe more.

I think of Fulham as being a very expensive area to live, I believe I am correct. I was surprised as to how many of the modern multi-million pound properties that are, or were, pubs; were in actual fact just a beer house. There were originally mostly beer houses in this area, and I am presuming they were serving the local barracks and the gas works. I have not researched this in detail, just the pubs.

I still have a few more updates to do, and move a couple of properties from Hammersmith back to Fulham, with relevant updates.

Enjoy,

Kevan

2018 pubs in the UK

Referring back to the problems differentiating between Fulham & Hammersmith, I have a mass of pub detail to add for 2018. In fact, far too much. There are 139 Boroughs / districts to add, I have done a few of those in London.

This is the list of 139 places to add, I will start with those in the South – there are about 55,000 licensed premises named in these lists:

Aberdeen City
Aberdeenshire
Adur
Allerdale
Amber Valley
Angus
Argyll and Bute
Arun
Ashfield
Ashford
Aylesbury Vale
Babergh
Barking and Dagenham
Barnet
Barnsley
Barrow-in-Furness
Basildon
Basingstoke and Deane
Bassetlaw
Bath and North East Somerset
Bedford
Bexley
Birmingham
Blaby
Blackburn with Darwen
Blackpool
Blaenau Gwent
Bolsover
Bolton
Boston
Bournemouth
Bracknell Forest
Bradford
Braintree
Breckland
Brent
Brentwood
Bridgend
Brighton and Hove
Bristol, City of
Broadland
Bromley
Bromsgrove
Broxbourne
Broxtowe
Burnley
Bury
Caerphilly
Calderdale
Cambridge
Camden
Cannock Chase
Canterbury
Cardiff
Carlisle
Carmarthenshire
Castle Point
Central Bedfordshire
Ceredigion
Charnwood
Chelmsford
Cheltenham
Cherwell
Cheshire East
Cheshire West and Chester
Chesterfield
Chichester
Chiltern
Chorley
Christchurch
City of Edinburgh
City of London
Clackmannanshire
Colchester
Conwy
Copeland
Cornwall
Cotswold
County Durham
Coventry
Craven
Crawley
Croydon
Dacorum
Darlington
Dartford
Daventry
Denbighshire
Derby
Derbyshire Dales
Doncaster
Dover
Dudley
Dumfries and Galloway
Dundee City
Ealing
East Ayrshire
East Cambridgeshire
East Devon

East Dorset
East Dunbartonshire
East Hampshire
East Hertfordshire
East Lindsey
East Lothian
East Northamptonshire
East Renfrewshire
East Riding of Yorkshire
East Staffordshire
Eastbourne
Eastleigh
Eden
Elmbridge
Enfield
Epping Forest
Epsom and Ewell
Erewash
Exeter
Falkirk
Fareham
Fenland
Fife
Flintshire
Forest Heath
Forest of Dean
Fylde
Gateshead
Gedling
Glasgow City
Gloucester
Gosport
Gravesham
Great Yarmouth
Greenwich
Guildford
Gwynedd
Hackney
Halton
Hambleton
Hammersmith and Fulham
Harborough
Haringey
Harlow
Harrogate
Harrow
Hart
Hartlepool
Hastings
Havant
Havering
Herefordshire, County of
Hertsmere
High Peak
Highland
Hillingdon
Hinckley and Bosworth
Horsham
Hounslow
Huntingdonshire
Hyndburn
Inverclyde
Ipswich
Isle of Anglesey
Isle of Wight
Isles of Scilly
Islington
Kensington and Chelsea
Kettering
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk
Kingston upon Hull, City of
Kingston upon Thames
Kirklees
Knowsley
Lambeth
Lancaster
Leeds
Leicester
Lewes
Lewisham
Lichfield
Lincoln
Liverpool
Luton
Maidstone
Maldon
Malvern Hills
Manchester
Mansfield
Medway
Melton
Mendip
Merthyr Tydfil
Merton
Mid Devon
Mid Suffolk
Mid Sussex
Middlesbrough
Midlothian
Milton Keynes

Mole Valley
Monmouthshire
Moray
Na h-Eileanan Siar
Neath Port Talbot
New Forest
Newark and Sherwood
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle-under-Lyme
Newham
Newport
North Ayrshire
North Devon
North Dorset
North East Derbyshire
North East Lincolnshire
North Hertfordshire
North Kesteven
North Lanarkshire
North Lincolnshire
North Norfolk
North Somerset
North Tyneside
North Warwickshire
North West Leicestershire
Northampton
Northumberland
Norwich
Nottingham
Nuneaton and Bedworth
Oadby and Wigston
Oldham
Orkney Islands
Oxford
Pembrokeshire
Pendle
Perth and Kinross
Peterborough
Plymouth
Poole
Portsmouth
Powys
Preston
Purbeck
Reading
Redbridge
Redcar and Cleveland
Redditch
Reigate and Banstead
Renfrewshire
Rhondda Cynon Taf
Ribble Valley
Richmond upon Thames
Richmondshire
Rochdale
Rochford
Rossendale
Rother
Rotherham
Rugby
Runnymede
Rushcliffe
Rushmoor
Rutland
Ryedale
Salford
Sandwell
Scarborough
Scottish Borders
Sedgemoor
Sefton
Selby
Sevenoaks
Sheffield
Shepway
Shetland Islands
Shropshire
Slough
Solihull
South Ayrshire
South Bucks
South Cambridgeshire
South Derbyshire
South Gloucestershire
South Hams
South Holland
South Kesteven
South Lakeland
South Lanarkshire
South Norfolk
South Northamptonshire
South Oxfordshire
South Ribble
South Somerset
South Staffordshire
South Tyneside
Southampton
Southend-on-Sea
Southwark
Spelthorne

St Albans
St Edmundsbury
St. Helens
Stafford
Staffordshire Moorlands
Stevenage
Stockport
Stockton-on-Tees
Stoke-on-Trent
Stratford-on-Avon
Stroud
Suffolk Coastal
Sunderland
Surrey Heath
Sutton
Swale
Swansea
Swindon
Tameside
Tamworth
Tandridge
Taunton Deane
Teignbridge
Telford and Wrekin
Tendring
Test Valley
Tewkesbury
Thanet
Three Rivers
Thurrock
Tonbridge and Malling
Torbay
Torfaen
Torridge
Tower Hamlets
Trafford
Tunbridge Wells
Uttlesford
Vale of Glamorgan
Vale of White Horse
Wakefield
Walsall
Waltham Forest
Wandsworth
Warrington
Warwick
Watford
Waveney
Waverley
Wealden
Wellingborough
Welwyn Hatfield
West Berkshire
West Devon
West Dorset
West Dunbartonshire
West Lancashire
West Lindsey
West Lothian
West Oxfordshire
West Somerset
Westminster
Weymouth and Portland
Wigan
Wiltshire
Winchester
Windsor and Maidenhead
Wirral
Woking
Wokingham
Wolverhampton
Worcester
Worthing
Wrexham
Wychavon
Wycombe
Wyre
Wyre Forest
York