Category: London Maps old and new

London street directory in 1842

Its time for the latest updates on History in London in 1842. One street which was of interest is Fludyer street, in Westminster. I originally thought is was an early name for Downing street, apparently I cannot jump to these conclusions lightly, and was slightly wrong. It is very close, but not quite the same street.

What is correct, is that the London 1842 street directory is just getting bigger and better. I have added all of the London 1832 street inhabitants already. I have now spent the day adding the letter C for 1842 and also now working on letter D. The London directory just keeps getting better and more useful. Most of this directory is on the site, but not quite all.

As mentioned in a previous blog, the 1842 London street directory is brilliant for finding people and old London pubs, who are listed in the 1841 census but do not have a clear address, i.e. they are named and in a specific road or street. This directory is a quick way of scanning this listing to find that person, and it is well indexed alphabetically.  The directory for 1842 has not been transcribed, and therefore a visual check is necessary, but if you are searching for just pubs and inns etc, it is likely that other listings on the site also hold similar detail. The 1833-34 Pigots directory is particularly useful. These other listings are available through the London Pub history pages which are also listed by London parish. You can also use the search engine, which is not bad, and searches about 50 thousand + pages on my sites.

One of  the downsides of building such an amazing site is that many people think it is a historical site of the past, built in the past, and that there are few updates to this site. This is far from the truth, and the site/s are updated every day with masses of new / old detail. Just today there have been over three hundred updates which are either new pages or images added to this London street directory of 1842.

I welcome feedback for the site, rather than just the regular emails asking about whether there are any additional pictures available! This site/ sites just keep getting better. I also welcome updates for the site/s.

Kevan

 

My lovely London street directory, Mile end road & the Isle of Dogs in maps

I am sort of overstepping my mark by making this a blog about the Isle of Dogs. The main reason is to flag up a site which I am nothing like, but I do things differently. If you want to see how to use maps in a brilliant manner, visit the Isle of Dogs blog ; it is pretty special; and I want a reminder of this blog. Mick is one of my contributors to the pub site.

Back onto my lovely London directory. I have been using it masses today. As I am working on some of the earlier records. e.g. in 1805 and 1820s, a street directory for 1832 comes in real handy.

Also, I was having a quick scan of the Whitechapel 1841 census earlier. My god, how easy was that to work out what pub a person was in, when I also had the 1842 street directory to compare with. Do you know what, I think I have finally cracked it, and all without maps so far – that’s the next bit to do.

As my usual aside, my wife came running downstairs with her laptop to show me St Marks square in Venice today. It is flooded massively, I think 150 centimetres of rain was mentioned! That’s five feet! It was a whole lot drier last week.

What else, oh yes, the Kings Head in Mile end road at 230; now just a kebab shop. After following some of the links from the London 1832 street directory, and also noting quite  a bit of early research added to the pub, I am now almost 100% certain this was previously the Weavers Arms, and goes back to  about 1823 with additional earlier pubs added for the same licensee.

I am now off to watch Paddington station on Channel 5, brilliant.

 

London 1832 street directory is now complete, stage 1

I am proud to announce that the London 1832 street directory is complete, in the sense that I have finished transcribing the original Robsons 1832 London street directory, and is now listed street by street on my new site – london19.com.

Also, all of the pubs listed should have a link to their historical reference page on the pub history site – pubshistory.com. I am guessing there may be a maximum of 5% of the pubs not linked, or maybe as low as 2%. That is stage one of this project complete.

For info, stage 2 is to add the entirety of the 1842 Robsons directory as image to each relevant page. Much of this has been done, but still lots to add.

Stage 3 is to add a mapping reference to each street, I have added a few, but this will take some time, I think. This links to the old Ordnance Survey maps of London being designed and referenced by NLS – National Library of Scotland.

Stage 4 is to look at the indexing of the site, and add a database friendly search which aids finding a street name, and the relevant pages. I may also build a mobile app.

The London 1832 / 1842 street directory is rather brilliant; and gets better every day.

Kevan

London 1832 streets directory and mapping early London

I am a bit out of sync with most normal working people, but this has little bearing on the work I am continuing with. The London 1832 streets directory is now almost complete. I have been saying this for a while, and then I find another tranche of streets which are not yet on the site.

I think withe the completion of the letter B, I am complete, but I will check again!

The second part of this brilliant project is to add the 1842 images; and this is taking a lot less time than the first part and is slowly building.

Part three is now to add a mapping link to each page to one of the excellent NLS mappings. NLS is short for National Library of Scotland, and they do have a rather enviable maps project which is rather brilliant. The best part of this, after some research is the mapping of an area in, say 1895, and modern days, both on the same page.

Here is a very simple example, Ducks foot lane, Upper Thames street.

I am next to start looking at indexing of the streets in London, and possibly add a local search engine just for this. This is not hard, as most web sites have their own mysql database which I am very familiar with.

The major part of the hard work has already been completed, and this London historical street directory could be amazing one day, if this is of interest.

The remit is to describe London without using maps, but with a few mappings along the way. So, yes, with old maps.

I think the most important part of this, to me, is to be able to describe early street addresses in London, and have some form of clarification on explaining where it may have existed; or what it may now be named.

Enjoy.

Kevan

London 1832 street directory and links to maps old and new

I think I am about to have a baby, and I am a a man, quite an old one at that. I have been in Brightlingsea this evening listening to the London Gospel community choir. They were absolutely amazing, and a rare find for such an off beat place in Essex.

Back to my baby. I have been thinking about adding some sort of mapping links to the London 1832 / 1842 street directory. I think a lot about this.

I have been researching a lot of what is already on offer by other providers, as I do not have the expertise to create anything like this, or the money, or the time.

If you visit any of my sites now, you will quickly become aware that I use a lot of text, i.e. my street directories are based on the occupants of a property at any time.

There is the brilliant ‘Locating London in 1746’ map which is fantastic, once you know where you are looking for, as  the map overlays the modern mapping with 1746 and about 1870 – this is brilliant.

Then there is the Scotland NLS (National Library of Scotland) maps. These are a bit random, and not greatly organised from their listings. But, once you do find a good map, and start to realise its potential to future research, the limits are infinity and beyond, or an old man about to give birth!

Here is a simple link, I hope it works. It should be a side by side desktop image of a mapping in about 1895 and today. I have chosen West Smithfield; and there are a number of pubs listed as P.H. as one does.

Here we go – West Smithfield 1832 London street directory with mapping data.