London street directory sites & Fulham in 1940

Well, I now have two sites in the top ten in google search for London street directory. Most people would envy this, and not a bad start.

I moved much of the London streets listings back to my London19 site, and also the massive 1843 street directory. I have only just done this, so it will take a while to feed through in search terms. Actually, I have already changed this, and the 1843 street directory is back on the pubs history site, this is the only change, all 255 pages of it.

I also added my London19 site to the adsense program (nothing to do with rehab!). Their site blanked it as a copy site, I think; and therefore their advertisers do not get the chance to advertise on my great London pub history site. Their loss.

Just added are a few roads in Fulham area, i.e. Fulham High street, Fulham road and Fulham Palace road – all in 1940.

But, I am still looking for a good sponsor.

 

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London street directory & create a sitemap

Being my normal self, I thought I would have a bit of a change today. So, the london19.com site became important again, it should, what a great name.

I have added the street directories for 1818,1832, 1842, 1843, 1940 and I think that’s all to this site. I have kept all pub stuff on the pub history site, and the 1921 street directory too. I am not sure why I made this decision, but anything can be changed.

The good thing is that the pub history site now has just under 50,000 html pages, which all fit on one sitemap for google. Good old google.

If you are ever interested, i can tell you how to create a site map of even this magnitude in a matter of a minute. Lets do it.

You first need to login via ssh to your linux web site hosting, I use putty which is a free ssh utility. You need to know the correct login details, too.

You then change directory to the top folder for your website, something like :

/var/www/vhosts/p**/httpdocs , e.g. cd /var/www/vhosts/p**/httpdocs

You then run a simple script which finds all files in the folder/s:

find `pwd` > foundthislot.txt

You then need to pick the specifics from this file, i.e. all of the .html pages

cat foundthislot.txt | grep shtml > findjusthtml.txt

Its quite simple.

Download this last file via ftp as you would normally, then do a grand edit of this file so that each line is relevant to the web page you are visiting.

 

Sitemaps are very important, and although this is easy; it took me a couple of years to get this right!

Don’t laugh at me for posting such a ridiculously simple way of creating google sitemaps. It really is that simple, it just took me a long time to realise the potential of linux power against the weakness of running in a Windows environment, which is good for desktop applications only.

You also need to use google webmaster tools to upload the sitemap at some stage, and see how your site is doing in desktop and mobile visibility, but this is another story.

 

 

 

 

Maybe I’m a Londoner

My last blog sounded a bit desperate. sorry, I spend a lot of time getting my sites updated with lots of interesting data content, even if it s all a bit nerdy. Perhaps I have rather a lot of different web sites running under the same name, and I could split them all up into separate entities.

But, no, I will concentrate on what I think I am trying to do, and explore the possibility that what I am trying to achieve is something different from other conventional sites.

Lets see what is on offer on my main site. It covers pub history of some sort for London and most of the South of the country. It is stronger in the London areas, but it does have the restriction that most data is before 1944. Excepting the complete listing of all pubs and bars in 2018.

Then there is more detailed data just on London, mainly to do with pubs from about 1800, and also complete London historical directories for 1832, 1843 and parts of 1921 and 1940.

Then there is a small site I built a while back as nogobritain, which demonstrated the difficulties which people with disabilities have with public transport, and this includes a complete listing of the entire tube network, and links to the relevant detail. some of this may be out of date, but still a damned good try.

More recently, well, the Christmas before last, I built a site or two about the 1918 armistice. As part of this, I honed in on a publication by the LCC which listed every Londoner who worked for the LCC (London County Council) who was involved in service in World War One. All of them, about 10,000, I think. I also added some other records of similar nature.

Then there is the Cosford database of Suffolk, this is part of Suffolk where my early agricultural labourer descendants started. They ended up in London, as did many others as agriculture was overrun by cheaper imports from America, and country folk moved into London to find work. I did quite a bit of research on my Suffolk ancestors by visiting record offices, but this database far outweighed any detail I could find at record offices or online. I saved a copy for merit, from the time machine, it’s brilliant.

I think I have summarised my main site, although I have others which research other areas of pub history and early taverns, coffee houses etc etc.

All my sites are searchable by one search engine, it is far from perfect, but I use it a lot.

One last point, I had a drive into London on the second day of the new year. It was an enjoyable drive, and I photographed a number of pubs which were useful. Obviously, driving in London is not conducive with taking photographs, and I got my first £65 fine through today for this! Whoops.

 

 

 

London street directory & pub history & google adverts

I am please to say that my two sites are doing well for the search term ‘London street directory’. They should be considering the amount of effort and time I have spent on my sites. I doubt they are the most exciting thing for most people to visit, but I am not looking for an outstanding site, just one that tells the truth. Two of my sites are in the top ten in google, pretty impressive.

I often search on pub history and the top search returns, and see some of the stories told by ‘usually newspapers’ who advertise the ten or fifteen oldest pubs in London. It is the usual regurgitated b###s with little proof of anything they can actually prove.

I am slowly adding the London 1940 directory at present, but occasionally take some time out to research other areas. I have spent the last couple of days in Banbury, Oxfordshire. I am quite amazed about the numbers of pubs, beer houses and hotels that existed in this market town at one stage in its life.

One mistake I made, well I think it was a mistake, I tried out an alternative to google ads to pay for the sites. I run my own server, and a number of individual web sites. Occasionally I add a new site, as I did recently with the london19.com site which is doing OK. The ads on this site do not appear to work any longer, hey ho, I can deal with this for the time being; but in my normal (or abnormal) presence, I will just drop the site if this continues forever, and move the content to a different site. This is one of my downfalls in planning, or lack of it. And as I say, hey ho!

So the new London 1832 street directory site is now my pubs history site; I have moved all of the pages. I was told by a certain advertising provider that the london 19 site broke rules, and was a doorway to my pub site, which I guess is true!

I am also the owner of deadpubs.co.uk which is well known, probably for the number of links to the site. This is a mish mash of stuff these days.

Onwards & upwards. Oh, and a flu jab costs less than a tenner at Tescos chemists and the service was great. I reckon  that was a good investment.

London street directory, London pub history & Ubuntu linux

Well, the London street directory has been growing over the past hours, days, weeks and months. I am slowly adding more 1940 street directory as I find the time and patience in adding this. There are about 1000 pages, each of which takes a day, so you can see why it takes time!

In the meantime, I do not entirely ignore the pub history sites. Although these are well placed in the google search engine, it often surprises me as to how little feedback I get about the pages. There are in excess of 50,000 pages on my sites, probably a lot more. I get lots of annoying emails, as we all do, most are deleted. What often gets me upset is that many of my images, and sometimes content suddenly appears on twitter, pinterest, facebook or other random sites, often just because people think that researching something means copying someone else hard work, or just plain ignorant, whatever.

I have no control over other peoples ignorance.

As part of the London street directory, what I have achieved over the last couple of days is to build a new index to my London pub history site. In fact I have added a little more detail than previously. I am even moving slowly towards adding postcodes! One day, the site will be much more prolific in its history after 1940, but this will be as I find the relevant detail.

Moving on, I purchased a second hand PC & monitor a couple of weeks ago. It has windows on it. It also has a terabyte of storage, and a decent monitor. All for about £200. The machine does not have MS software, just openoffice which is the same as google apps. My son tells me he only uses this, as it does what is necessary, and is also free.

I agree, I never use MS Office apart from an old copy of Sharepoint designer 2007 which crashes all of the time, and am looking for something a lot better. I do use textpad, a free text editor, and for which I purchase a license for about £10. This software is invaluable.

So far, I have resized the partitions on the disk of this new PC following online instructions, and installed a free copy of Ubuntu as dual boot, and I have added a couple of bits of software, i.e. gimp, netbeans, Apache web server, and also logged into my google account which has copies of most of my current Windows desktop files.

My web server also runs on linux, and I am fairly OK with what I need to do to mirror my files on various different environments.

To my amazement, opening some of the files I am transcribing, in google docs on my linux machine, are immediately transcribed for me, and this will save me hours of work, I am at a new stage in my life where I decide whether to make the plunge away from the rubbish Windows environment (which is generally expensive and shit) to one where I am a lot more productive. In Linux, you can also run a small script to build or edit an entire file system or a whole bunch of files in a matter of minutes, e.g. I can create a entire sitemap in a matter of minutes. It is just a no brainer, I just need to take the jump. I probably never will, but the option is NOW available.

That is where I am at, whilst the UK as a whole goes through the brexit progress, of which I will not post any personal response.

London pub history & 1940 street directory & more

It’s late. I have just spent the day adding the 1940 street directory for Commercial road, east London and others. There are a surprisingly few pubs in this street, but not a problem.

Both sites, the London street directory site, and the pub history site now look a little different due to style changes, a grey background, and also a change in the advertising provider.

I then started to look at individual pubs, well at Shoreditch pubs, and started with the Acorn. I thought it about time to look at individual pages on the site, and make them  ore attractive, rather than just a plethora of facts / landlord lists. I have added the 1939 Electoral register to this page for Thomas John Bryant and a host of early history for a 30 year long licensee of the Acorn, with links to the Queens Arms – I will leave you to read the entirety of the story, for what it’s worth!

I did find the Hackney road listing in 1940 incredibly useful when comparing addresses in this road, and in particularly the Queens Arms. A damned blooming useful listing although I say it myself!

All my changes take a lot of time due to the volume of pubs listed, which is most of them!