London pub, taverns & coffee houses history random updates

I have been quite busy recently. I am trying to get up the google search for London street directory, with my transcripts of the complete Robsons 1832 directory, plus images of the 1842. This site is fantastically useful and I refer to it all of the time. I am at about 6.2 out of all the millions at present, and climbing.

https://london19.com/streets1832/index.shtml

Another thing I have been up to is getting more detail on some of the early taverns, and coffee houses. I can’t always find which London ward to add these to, especially if they are 1666 or thereabouts, so started adding these to another new site:

https://londontaverns.co.uk/

My favourite is the last entry on the index, the Red Lion, near to Fleet ditch. It makes fascinating reading. I could add more, but this will do for now.

A lot of this detail is in books which are freely available to use and download, and some of them, in fact most of them are actually transcribed on line already, under various guises. I just want the relevant bits to add to a page / s.

I have recently upgraded the server as I was running low on space. I have not seen any main benefits to this yet, but it allows me to add as much stuff as I see fit.

I have probably been up to loads of other things, like redesign of the sites etc. One day the site will be mobile friendly, and I will get there eventually.

My friend Ewan at pubology has just sent me a large Marylebone pub history update, which has been added. I believe there is an even larger one for St Pancras to come soon.

Meanwhile, I spent a little time this evening working on the Seven Dials area of London. I am getting the hang of this area slowly. My examples are those public houses in Monmouth street until about 1846, then the street disappears and reverts as Dudley street for a while, or Broad street for the Kings Head.

All of these streets eventually become part of Shaftesbury avenue. I have not worked this bit out as of yet.

Kevan

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More Early pub history for London

I have new blogs building on my site, but for now this one seems quite popular. The pub history site which relates heavily to London and surrounds just gets better every day. I have been adding the 1836 London Pigots directory, and also just completed a first run through of Holdens 1811 directory. Both are good. See the London pub history pages.

These complement my street directories for London in 1832 and 1842 which are a major boon for looking for early pubs in London.

Also, I have just upgraded the server which the sites run on, It is now twice as fast, and has twice as much space. Lots more room for updates.

That’s all for now

Maybe I’m a Londoner

My last blog sounded a bit desperate. sorry, I spend a lot of time getting my sites updated with lots of interesting data content, even if it s all a bit nerdy. Perhaps I have rather a lot of different web sites running under the same name, and I could split them all up into separate entities.

But, no, I will concentrate on what I think I am trying to do, and explore the possibility that what I am trying to achieve is something different from other conventional sites.

Lets see what is on offer on my main site. It covers pub history of some sort for London and most of the South of the country. It is stronger in the London areas, but it does have the restriction that most data is before 1944. Excepting the complete listing of all pubs and bars in 2018.

Then there is more detailed data just on London, mainly to do with pubs from about 1800, and also complete London historical directories for 1832, 1843 and parts of 1921 and 1940.

Then there is a small site I built a while back as nogobritain, which demonstrated the difficulties which people with disabilities have with public transport, and this includes a complete listing of the entire tube network, and links to the relevant detail. some of this may be out of date, but still a damned good try.

More recently, well, the Christmas before last, I built a site or two about the 1918 armistice. As part of this, I honed in on a publication by the LCC which listed every Londoner who worked for the LCC (London County Council) who was involved in service in World War One. All of them, about 10,000, I think. I also added some other records of similar nature.

Then there is the Cosford database of Suffolk, this is part of Suffolk where my early agricultural labourer descendants started. They ended up in London, as did many others as agriculture was overrun by cheaper imports from America, and country folk moved into London to find work. I did quite a bit of research on my Suffolk ancestors by visiting record offices, but this database far outweighed any detail I could find at record offices or online. I saved a copy for merit, from the time machine, it’s brilliant.

I think I have summarised my main site, although I have others which research other areas of pub history and early taverns, coffee houses etc etc.

All my sites are searchable by one search engine, it is far from perfect, but I use it a lot.

One last point, I had a drive into London on the second day of the new year. It was an enjoyable drive, and I photographed a number of pubs which were useful. Obviously, driving in London is not conducive with taking photographs, and I got my first £65 fine through today for this! Whoops.

 

 

 

London street directory in 1832, 1842 etc & London pub history

The London street directory which I am building slowly from early London directories is now reaching an important stage. All of the Robsons 1832 street directory is now listed in transcript form on the site; there is an individual page for each street or road. The vast majority of the 1842 street directory has also been added to the relevant pages in image format. This latter detail gives a significant amount of additional detail to that of 1832, which is fairly basic.

Both of the Robsons directories are being cross-checked with the Pigots 1833 directory listing of pubs, which has been brilliant in  confirming whether a street did actually exist in 1832 even if not listed. There is nearly twenty years of pub history research on my sites, and it is fairly detailed, and also fairly thorough.

I have also been starting to add the early coffee houses, taverns and hotels to the relevant directory; the early street directories make this so much easier to locate a specific area and parish to add these entries. These street directory listings are in an entirely different format to anything which currently exists, and should be viewed as an incredibly useful and freely available resource.

The addition of mapping an early street address to an early map is starting to take place. The mappings I am using also show the address in modern day format using the National Library of Scotland site in the links.

Basically, the London history site is improving every day, and the current build is all being completed and funded by one person (me), with zero additional funding from any organisations.

I hope you enjoy the site, and other historical sites like the pub history site which is particularly strong in London for extensive earlier research.

Let me know if you wish to help out in anyway, or even an offer to sponsor the sites would be great.

Kevan

London 1842 street directory, pubs history and RBKC Library

Well, today, as ever, I am continuing to build a complete London street directory for 1842 in addition to that of London in 1832, both Robsons directories. I am now working through letter T, and nearing completion.

All of the Robsons 1832 street directory is on the site, except I keep finding bits missing, e.g. Trafalgar square! It was there in 1832, I checked. Many other streets appear to have been missed, and I am slowly adding these as I see fit.

One street missing was Tichborne street, Edgware road. As usual, I check that it did exist in this period, using my Pigots 1833 pub listing. I then wondered about the spelling, and chucked the address into google. I came across an amazing photograph, and even more amazing is that it is on my pub history site – see previous link.

Further amazing pictures started to be listed, and this led me to Dave. I think either the blog is written by Dave, or he has a friend called Dave; both are plausible. I am noting this here, as I have spent quite a lot of time reading the articles, they are interesting, and I shall read the rest slowly. One of the Daves is a Local Studies Librarian for the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Brilliant blog – called the RBKC.

I spend quite  lot of time updating my sites, and adding new sites of historical interest. I hope somebody likes my style, however boring it may look. I keep checking to see how I am getting on in google search for London street directory, currently 6,12 & 13. And for London 1832 street directory, most of the first 40 entries, etc.

The pub history site is also not bad, but a little clinical; and the local search engine only finds the latest updates. All of my 1899 pub listing, with all pubs linked to is ignored, as it is not a recent update. I will have to rebuild all of these pages.

Lots to do. And the house is to be plastered on Thursday & Friday. This makes a change from me being plastered; and lots of clearing still needs to be done. And Blue Planet II music is playing again for about the 50th time in succession. I love the last track which is so beautiful, yet very sad. Track 19 – Walrus: The right piece of Ice.

Yes, a bit sad, but music to be played out to, if you know what I mean.

The amazing London pub history site

I have spent the day updating a couple of pages of pubs starting with the letter W , being very old public houses in the 1832 era. This was in the time of William IV, son of George III, about nine years before Queen Victoria came to the throne and two years before slavery was abolished, apparently.

I have found most of these pubs on the site, and linked to the relevant page.

I have to say, this is pretty amazing to be able to do this. It shows how the pub history site has evolved over the last 18 years in which I have been building it, along with a number of incredible people continually updating me with updates, often too fast, but always with ground breaking new information.

I am very proud to say that I know this is the best London pub history site that will ever exist; and also that I am slowly building it towards an entire London history site about all of the streets in London, obviously we’ll need a pub somewhere!

Thanks as ever to Stephen Harris and Ewan, and many others for this remarkable London history site. And the 1832 London street directory along with the London 1842 street directory continues to build slowly.

Enjoy.