Category: Finding old London pubs

London street directory & pub history in 2018

I always promise to myself that I will add newer detail to my pub history sites. A while back I came across a free to use dataset, with no license restrictions, of the pubs that are in existence in August 2018. These are National listings, but I am currently working on just those in London.

The data comes from the food standards agency, and should therefore be of a high accuracy. There are just over 4400 open pubs listed, as in August 2018, in London Boroughs. I have therefore reciprocated these pages & data, already.

I though I would start to walk the walk through this data, to see what I already have on my pub history site, and more importantly, to see which areas I need to include in the London street directory. I have already spotted that there are bits of London which are not included, I should know this, as I live in one of these boroughs which was previously in Essex.

Other London boroughs which were previously in Kent, Surrey, Middlesex etc are a bit less clear to myself. My next updates are to include the Borough of Bexley, of which I know very little.

That’s it really. Updates continue.

 

 

London pub history & 1940 street directory & more

It’s late. I have just spent the day adding the 1940 street directory for Commercial road, east London and others. There are a surprisingly few pubs in this street, but not a problem.

Both sites, the London street directory site, and the pub history site now look a little different due to style changes, a grey background, and also a change in the advertising provider.

I then started to look at individual pubs, well at Shoreditch pubs, and started with the Acorn. I thought it about time to look at individual pages on the site, and make them  ore attractive, rather than just a plethora of facts / landlord lists. I have added the 1939 Electoral register to this page for Thomas John Bryant and a host of early history for a 30 year long licensee of the Acorn, with links to the Queens Arms – I will leave you to read the entirety of the story, for what it’s worth!

I did find the Hackney road listing in 1940 incredibly useful when comparing addresses in this road, and in particularly the Queens Arms. A damned blooming useful listing although I say it myself!

All my changes take a lot of time due to the volume of pubs listed, which is most of them!

 

 

London 1940 street directory & pub history

The London street directory is slowly building, and that of 1940 is slowly being added. I have posted on the 1940 index a reason for doing this, which mainly ties up with the London blitz and also the excellent 1939 electoral register – the latter has dates of birth which are incredibly useful for anyone researching their family history. I am also adding links back to the relevant pub and its history.

I will shortly be adding Hackney road in 1940; the 1832 and 1842 listings are very near completion, and there are random 1921 streets. The 1940 directory also lists a far greater selection of London, i.e. all of it. Many of the more outlying parts of London were listed in suburban directories, e.g. in Battersea, Greenwich etc.

Another interesting fact is a new trend in google search. As google knows who I am, and the names of some of my main web sites, it actually tells me the average trending position for my sites, e.g. if I type a search for ‘London street directory’, my sites are averaging at 6.2 and 19.2 although in the top ten positions, I have entries at 7, 8 and 9 for various pages. The same goes for the words ‘pub history’ as a search, where three sites are listed as at 2.7, 6.4 and 8.5; there are many major sites out there that do not trend as well.

It is also interesting to note that writing a simple blog post like this gets noticed in search engines specifically as more interesting than any individual page on a site where there may be 50,000 pages. I guess because the wordpress posting is very recent, it is also in a more interesting readable format than many of my pages on pub history or street directories.

This is one of the better 1832 street directory pages, i.e. Great Ormond street ; 

I chose that page as google showed an early interest in it, and using it showcase how all of the other pages on the site could look as I find the time. There is never enough of it.

London pub history & address updates

Apparently, there are a number of pubs which have closed since 2008, maybe a quarter of all pubs. This is systematic of the property prices, and also supply & demand. I am not surprised. Many of the pubs I used to visit were awful. I always look out for a Wetherspoons pub if I want a decent pint and food, these days, anywhere I happen to be visiting in the UK.

I wonder what is the definition of a pub these days, anyway.

The pub history site lists pubs since at least 1832, and the addresses are often severely out of date. I am planning to start updating all addresses as I visit a page for a pub to its latest address. Even if this address is still up to 80 years out of date, hey ho!

I do pub history of an early address, rightmove does the later stuff, and considering they are making millions out of property, they ought to be sponsoring my site. Well, someone ought to be doing this. I continue to add later street directories for London

Me, I just keep slogging along with updating every day  about the history in a long gone era, which is far more interesting than the current valuations of a property.

Or maybe NOT.

 

 

London street directory in 1832, 1842 etc & London pub history

The London street directory which I am building slowly from early London directories is now reaching an important stage. All of the Robsons 1832 street directory is now listed in transcript form on the site; there is an individual page for each street or road. The vast majority of the 1842 street directory has also been added to the relevant pages in image format. This latter detail gives a significant amount of additional detail to that of 1832, which is fairly basic.

Both of the Robsons directories are being cross-checked with the Pigots 1833 directory listing of pubs, which has been brilliant in  confirming whether a street did actually exist in 1832 even if not listed. There is nearly twenty years of pub history research on my sites, and it is fairly detailed, and also fairly thorough.

I have also been starting to add the early coffee houses, taverns and hotels to the relevant directory; the early street directories make this so much easier to locate a specific area and parish to add these entries. These street directory listings are in an entirely different format to anything which currently exists, and should be viewed as an incredibly useful and freely available resource.

The addition of mapping an early street address to an early map is starting to take place. The mappings I am using also show the address in modern day format using the National Library of Scotland site in the links.

Basically, the London history site is improving every day, and the current build is all being completed and funded by one person (me), with zero additional funding from any organisations.

I hope you enjoy the site, and other historical sites like the pub history site which is particularly strong in London for extensive earlier research.

Let me know if you wish to help out in anyway, or even an offer to sponsor the sites would be great.

Kevan

London 1842 street directory, pubs history and RBKC Library

Well, today, as ever, I am continuing to build a complete London street directory for 1842 in addition to that of London in 1832, both Robsons directories. I am now working through letter T, and nearing completion.

All of the Robsons 1832 street directory is on the site, except I keep finding bits missing, e.g. Trafalgar square! It was there in 1832, I checked. Many other streets appear to have been missed, and I am slowly adding these as I see fit.

One street missing was Tichborne street, Edgware road. As usual, I check that it did exist in this period, using my Pigots 1833 pub listing. I then wondered about the spelling, and chucked the address into google. I came across an amazing photograph, and even more amazing is that it is on my pub history site – see previous link.

Further amazing pictures started to be listed, and this led me to Dave. I think either the blog is written by Dave, or he has a friend called Dave; both are plausible. I am noting this here, as I have spent quite a lot of time reading the articles, they are interesting, and I shall read the rest slowly. One of the Daves is a Local Studies Librarian for the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Brilliant blog – called the RBKC.

I spend quite  lot of time updating my sites, and adding new sites of historical interest. I hope somebody likes my style, however boring it may look. I keep checking to see how I am getting on in google search for London street directory, currently 6,12 & 13. And for London 1832 street directory, most of the first 40 entries, etc.

The pub history site is also not bad, but a little clinical; and the local search engine only finds the latest updates. All of my 1899 pub listing, with all pubs linked to is ignored, as it is not a recent update. I will have to rebuild all of these pages.

Lots to do. And the house is to be plastered on Thursday & Friday. This makes a change from me being plastered; and lots of clearing still needs to be done. And Blue Planet II music is playing again for about the 50th time in succession. I love the last track which is so beautiful, yet very sad. Track 19 – Walrus: The right piece of Ice.

Yes, a bit sad, but music to be played out to, if you know what I mean.

The amazing London pub history site

I have spent the day updating a couple of pages of pubs starting with the letter W , being very old public houses in the 1832 era. This was in the time of William IV, son of George III, about nine years before Queen Victoria came to the throne and two years before slavery was abolished, apparently.

I have found most of these pubs on the site, and linked to the relevant page.

I have to say, this is pretty amazing to be able to do this. It shows how the pub history site has evolved over the last 18 years in which I have been building it, along with a number of incredible people continually updating me with updates, often too fast, but always with ground breaking new information.

I am very proud to say that I know this is the best London pub history site that will ever exist; and also that I am slowly building it towards an entire London history site about all of the streets in London, obviously we’ll need a pub somewhere!

Thanks as ever to Stephen Harris and Ewan, and many others for this remarkable London history site. And the 1832 London street directory along with the London 1842 street directory continues to build slowly.

Enjoy.